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<ART>Friday, March 31Big Bone Art Show You’ve been good for most of the week, and to show their appreciation, The Oddity Studios are throwing you a “Big Bone.” As part of the F.A.T. Friday festivities, the Big Bone Art Show will feature original artwork in all mediums. Fifteen artists are on board so far, and you’ll get a kick out of works like “The Dawn of Bone” by Bryan Renfro. Live music accompanies the artistic pleasantries, and each visitor receives a free copy of “The Herald Sparrow,” a new publication with joyously offbeat sensibilities. Enjoy looking at artwork you can’t afford (yet) and dream big. If your imagination needs some encouragement, the trolley hop wine is a nice starting point. —Matt MattinglyNancy’s Bagel Grounds 2101 Frankfort Ave.599-6576Free; 6-9 p.m.

Ben Wright’s art has something to say

You’re young and you’ve got something to say. How do you say it? If you’re an artist, your art does the talking for you.

Rumor & Innuendo: Rumblings From the World of Sports

No, no Nolan. I’ve heard some pretty accurate but mighty disturbing whispers about the collegiate inclinations of superüberprepster Nolan Smith. For a long while now, the son of former Card icon Derek Smith has been considered a lock to wear red and black. Not anymore. I’ve got it on good authority that the kid and his family are now thinking blue. As in Blue Devils. Say it ain’t so. Seems Smith’s connections with U of L — Vince Taylor, and to some extent, Reggie Theus — aren’t on the Belknap campus anymore, and young Nolan no longer feels connected to the Cardinal program. Taylor, currently a Minnesota T-Wolves assistant, apparently has the Smiths’ ear. Duke’s Johnny Dawkins keeps in touch with him so young Nolan will feel the Blue Devil love. While, I’m advised, the Cardinals haven’t beseeched former staffer Vince to be a go-between on their behalf. How sad is this story?

What a Week

Embryonic spree In a potential setback to right-wing sanctimony, U of L researchers announced a breakthrough in coaxing adult bone-marrow cells to mimic embryonic stem cells. The research could lead to cures for various diseases without harvesting cells from embryos. Despite the windfall for the embryo community, no embryos returned repeated phone calls or e-mails seeking comment. (Because they’re, you know, embryos.)

A commander reflects on Election Day in Iraq

By Lt. Col. John G. Norris
U.S. Army 4th Battalion 23rd Infantry of the Stryker Brigade

MOSUL, Iraq (December 15, 2005)—It is 1:45 a.m. on Election Day here. A Stryker platoon under my command reports that one of their vehicles has struck an IED (an improvised explosive device, or booby trap) hidden in the curb on one of our busy streets in southern Mosul. There is no damage to soldier or Stryker vehicle and they are able to continue the mission and continue route security operations in preparations for the elections to follow in a few hours.

Home on the range: At Knob Creek, the sound of gunfire is a popular American song

I’m walking walk down the dusty stretch that leads to the main firing line at Knob Creek Gun Range, wading through military, ex-military, militia, gun vendors and god knows who else. It’s easy to lose yourself amid the sporadic crackle of semi-automatic machine guns and the thunderous booms of antique cannons...

Feminist synergy: Kentucky Foundation for Women celebrates 20 years

BY MOLLY CUNNINGHAM In the Arcadia Community Center in south Louisville’s Wilder Park neighborhood, a half-dozen Somali women sit on the couch in a brightly painted room chattering in Bantu. Each woman is wrapped from head to toe in cloths of varying colors and patterns, each carefully styled into a harmonized outfit. One woman hunches over a wide-ruled notebook on the coffee table, practicing her alphabet as she participates in the gossip.

No End Insight: Round 2

At the start of every Metro Council meeting, 10 constituents get to speak briefly about whatever they want, whether it’s on the Council agenda or not. Last Thursday in a City Hall decked with poinsettias, five addressed an issue that wasn’t set for discussion at the last meeting of 2005: cable TV.

Scott Mullins heading north

Scott Mullins, whose voice has been heard on local public radio for 20 years, is leaving WFPK-FM for a start-up Triple-A station in Milwaukee. Mullins’ last broadcast will be his long-running “Blues Party” on Saturday, Jan. 7.

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Through Dec. 24
Last-minute Christmas shopping
If you like standing in line, bumping into smelly strangers, being cut off in parking lots and being trampled every time that stupid blue light starts to flash, then you’re in luck — it’s last-minute shopping season for Christmas. Every year at this time, reluctant husbands, fathers, bachelors, evil clowns and other procrastinators realize they not only haven’t bought any Christmas presents for their friends and families, they also haven’t returned that ugly tie they received last year. This is their chance to wander haplessly and dazed through Oxmoor Center for four hours buying things people don’t want or need (and Mom, if you don’t want the Madden ’05 game for Xbox I bought you, I’ve got a tie I’ll trade you for it), only to walk upstairs and be warmed by the fact that you can, indeed, buy draft beer at the food court. Ah, salvation. Merry Christmas, and a Happy Hangover. —Kevin Gibson