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This I Believe: How did the old Edward R. Murrow program fade away? And how did it make a comeback in the 21st century?

Ira Glass, discussing the book “This I Believe,” which collects essays wherein people state core beliefs, said: “It makes me hopeful about America … Hopeful in a way that’s in short supply lately.” Reading essays by Louisville-area residents made me feel the same. A dozen appear in this issue as part of a new partnership between LEO and WFPK-FM to bring those essays to light. Details are listed on page 12, and we encourage you to not only read these essays but to also examine your core beliefs and write your own. —Cary Stemle, editor

City Strobe

Anything for a dollarIn a letter sent to supporters three weeks ago, U.S. Rep. Anne Northup asked for financial contributions to her campaign, saying she was behind in fundraising because of the break she took in campaigning following the death of her son Joshua, who died in July of an undiagnosed heart ailment. She referred to Joshua’s death as “the circumstance.”

Rumor & Innuendo

Saints are marching in.

What if? IdeaFestival gets a new home in Louisville. What do you have in your attic?

Frank Lloyd Wright said, “An idea is salvation by imagination.” Kris Kimel said, “Why not?” OK, I don’t know if he literally said that, but when Kimel was pondering a festival of ideas, the Lexington scientist and entrepreneur clearly was thinking big. IdeaFestival, the subject of Fairleigh Brooks’ cover story (Page 14), moves to new home in Louisville next week. The four-day program is far-reaching and impressive, and we are happy to see Louisville host a progressive event that celebrates thinking. Could this be the start of something big?—Cary Stemle, editor

Photography as social activism — do you care? Photojournalist James Nachtwey dares to look at the hard truth

“Mother attending a dying son” by James NachtweyThis exhibition presents lessons in current events and geography. Wars, bombings, mutilation — you can sum it up as man’s inhumanity to man. It’s possible to learn something about the world’s monstrous acts, yet be instantly grateful to be a spectator from a safe distance.

Staffpicks

<ART>Through Oct. 21Photo Show    I’m not telling you anything new when I say myths and fairy tales are full of humanity’s dark side, or the “shadow selves,” as photographer Mary Yates calls it. “There isn’t always a happy ending,” she states in the press release about her work. “If a pleasant conclusion is reached, there has been much turmoil and grief suffered to attain the fruits of victory. Malevolence, suffering and the hope for divine reward — the shadow lurks in all scenarios.”

Making it legal: Mayor’s Committee on Public Art creates legit venue for graffiti art

Some of the players: involved with the new graffiti wall on East Market Street. Standing, from left to right, Jo Anne Triplett and Bob Markert, members of the Mayor’s Committee on Public Art, and Cynthia Knapek from Operation Brightside. In front, artists Jeral Tidwell and Se“We all need a place for Some of the players: involved with the new graffiti wall on East Market Street. Standing, from left to right, Jo Anne Triplett and Bob Markert, members of the Mayor’s Committee on Public Art, and Cynthia Knapek from Operation Brightside. In front, artists Jeral Tidwell and Se voice,” says Jeral Tidwell, the “lowbrow” graphics artist whose own fervent voice has helped convince the mayor’s office, no less, that legal graffiti art may become the next cultural asset for Louisville.

On The Scuzz of Campaign Politics: Is Anne Northup a big fat liar? (New attack ads, Web site, more of the same misdirection)

Note: The Stink Eye thinks context is important, especially during political campaigns, many of which tend to thrive on the lack of it. So for the next five issues, we’ll be here to offer some context and analysis to the squabbling that will no doubt pollute your eyes, ears and minds until Nov. 7. If you’ve got something to say — about us or them — write to citystrobe@leoweekly.com.

Splatters: ART NEWS BITS

David Kern, formerly the executive director of the New Center for Contemporary Art at 742 E. Market St., is now executive director of the Historic Homes Foundation, which oversees Whitehall, Farmington and the Thomas Edison House. Co-founder Jay Jordan will continue operating the New Center.

City Strobe

Are you ready for this? A new director of sales and marketing has joined the LEO team. And he’s straight outta Velocity. His name is Kelly Gream, and his departure is surely the subject of much consternation over at Sixth and Broadway. So what’s up with that?