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City Strobe: This vandal has a steady, considered hand

The signage for Liberty Green, the mixed-income housing development now being constructed on the former footprint of downtown’s Clarksdale housing project, is innocuous enough: title, phone numbers one might dial to inquire about living there, artistic renditions of a few model buildings. But when driving by the fenced-in lots last weekend, we noticed an addition: Directly under the title, in neat, considered cursive, is this bit of graffiti: “Built On Broken Promises.” Until you read it closely, you might think it’s part of the actual sign — a weird thing for Metro Government to say about one of its flagship public-private housing projects.

DAVE BARRY 2006 YEAR IN REVIEW (BY DAVE BARRY), Tribune Media Services

It was a momentous year, a year of events that will echo in the annals of history the way a dropped plate of calamari echoes in an Italian restaurant with a tile floor. Decades from now, our grandchildren will come to us and say, “Tell us, Grandpa or Grandma as the case may be, what it was like to be alive in the year that Angelina Jolie, Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Britney Spears and Katie whatshername all had babies, although not necessarily in those combinations.” And we will smile wisely and emit a streamer of drool, because we will be very old and unable to hear them.

City Strobe: Neighbor to OLCH: It’s not you, it’s your volume

John Glenn wants to clear up a few things.The owner of a Hill Street apartment complex behind Old Louisville Coffeehouse loves what manager Peter Berkowitz has done with the place.“I am so thankful the coffeehouse is there,” said Glenn, 46, who, since October, has repeatedly called Metro Police about the venue’s amplified shows because he says they’re too loud. LEO reported a couple weeks ago that Berkowitz and Glenn were going to court over the matter. It’s now on the docket for Jan. 3.

The winners of — and answers to — LEO’s 2006 Not-Good-For-Nothing Quiz

"Only a good-for-nothing is not interested in his past.” —Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis   Several people took our annual year-end Not Good For Nothing Quiz on-line (answers printed below), therefore qualifying to compete for some cool prizes. Thank you to everyone who played and hopefully enjoyed the quiz, and congratulations to these winners:

The Tear Sheet : Bungling the name game - Is changing 22nd Street the best we can do to honor Dr. King’s legacy?

Louisville, can’t we do better?Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered on April 4, 1968, and since that dark day we’ve had seven presidents, nine governors and 38 Kentucky Derbies, and we’re still fighting over naming a street after him?

City Strobe - Metro Council: Meet the new boss

The Louisville Metro Council elected Rick Blackwell, D-12, to its highest post last Thursday, putting to rest any rumors that the majority-wielding caucus couldn’t hold it together for a major vote — oh wait, passing the dog ordinance did that. Yeah, never mind.

Man on fire: A chat about the future

see: downtown development, housing, the arena, the Bridges Project and 8664 — with Mayor Jerry AbramsonMost of Mayor Jerry Abramson’s speeches, no matter the subject, are laden with a resounding sense of optimism. To his detractors, this may be his greatest and most annoying fault: If everything in Jerry’s World is always hopeful and sanguine, then he’s cheerleading, ignoring reality to make his impact seem more profound. Similarly, the speeches are easy rallying cries for his supporters, of which there are many: He cruised in the November election with nearly 70 percent of the vote.

Rumor & Innuendo

Give the points.

Of shoes and ships and sealing-wax — and all of the art that sticks in 2006

Empujon: In August at 21C Museum Hotel, Louisville Ballet dancer David Ingram debuted Empujon, a new contemporary dance troupe that includes several members of the Ballet. Photo by Eddie DantDid the events and performances of 2006 make any difference in the overall vitality of Louisville’s arts scene? If so, how? Those who write about the arts for LEO took those questions to heart and surveyed the offerings served up to the public in 2006. Per usual, it was a smorgasbord, with fare ranging from the highbrow, such as Louisville Ballet’s showcase of pieces in its “Four for All” program, to lowbrow, such as the new city-sanctioned space for graffiti art on East Market Street. This range of choices encapsulates Louisville’s best attributes: a mix of creative organizations and events to serve almost any taste.

City Strobe: Got cultural vitality?

So you think Louisville is among the nation’s leading arts communities? That depends on factors considered. The Urban Institute, a non-profit research organization, gathered statistics based on census data about the number of artists, artist jobs, nonprofit arts contributions and other data, and in seven categories ranked the top 50 cities.