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Art: Negotiating grass

Ezra Kellerman unveils his social sculpture ‘Nineveh’

The first thing you notice about “Nineveh,” Ezra Kellerman’s site-specific installation at the Cressman Center, is the way it transforms the gallery.

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Art: Young gallery struggles to save dying art

During the golden age of mix tapes in the ’80s, when they freely roamed the Earth uncontested, it was hard to imagine a time when they wouldn’t exist in plentitude.

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Art: The snapshot: trivial or revered?

It seems that people who take themselves too seriously — the kind who buy nicer cameras than they really need and post close-ups of roses and “textures” on their Flickr pages &mda

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Art: A sometimes-pious pastiche

KMAC’s artist-in-residence makes herself at home

These days, Alice Stone can be found perched up on the third floor of the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft.

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Art: Digital artist examines what it is to be American

In his new exhibit at Art Ecology, digital artist J.B. Wilson uses a colorful combination of images and words on illuminated panels.

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Profile: Ben Bridwell

The urge to create and discover potential in material has been in Ben Bridwell all his life. He discovered metal art when he worked as a welder at a swimming pool company.

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Profile: Russel Hulsey

It has to the ultimate non-violent statement when the ultimate non-violent man is hit in the nose. “It was very difficult to do, to hit Gandhi,” says Russel Hulsey, 35.

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Profile: Al Nelson

Inspired by themes of faith, hope and love, Al Nelson creates stunning sculptures from stone,  impressive landmarks in the Louisville area that include “Let’s Play Ball,” the

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Profile: Rhonda Caldwell

Rhonda Caldwell, 36, calls herself “The Graphic Design Girl.” It simplifies things. Her business name and logo “simply reflect who I am and what I love doing,” she says.

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For art’s sake

More public art in Louisville? Yes, please

The underside of the Interstate 65 overpass on East Market Street is as plain and boring as buying in bulk: gray walls of paneled concrete stand perpendicular to standard sidewalks sprinkled with r