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February 14, 2006

Staff Picks

<MUSIC>Friday, Feb. 17Sigur Ros            Sometimes listening to Icelandic experimental outfit Sigur Ros is a little like watching a glacier melt. It’s laborious, but in an altogether pleasing way, and it’s rewarding in the end when a big piece finally breaks off and floats away to disappear. It’s subtle and calm, and you ask yourself every once in a while what possibly possessed you to watch a glacier melt, and then you remember you needed some serenity and this seemed as good as anything. By that point, the record’s over (in this case, their latest Takk was playing, and it was an extrasensory series of moments) and you have a good taste in your mouth. —Stephen GeorgePalace Theatre625 S. Fourth St.361-3100$34; 8 p.m.All ages<THEATER>Feb. 17-18‘Menopause: The Musical Out Loud’            Get this: The set is Bloomingdale’s, the prop a black lace bra, the soundtrack re-lyricized tunes from the ’60s and ’70s and the characters four women on the brink of “The Change.” It’s a man’s worst nightmare, or possibly the funniest premise to come along in a while. We’ve all been affected by menopause, either indirectly or directly — you tiptoed over to turn the thermostat up past 50 while you were home for Christmas (as your dad gratefully peeled off his multilayered sweaters), or you found yourself sobbing violently watching the end of “When Harry Met Sally” on TBS for the hundredth time. Creator Jeanie Linders wants to alter the perception of menopause as “The Silent Passage” by encouraging healthy dialogue about issues of women’s aging. She’s also putting her money where her mouth is. As the lighthearted show travels across the country, proceeds will be donated to local Ovarian Cancer charities by the Women for Women Foundation. —Rebecca HaithcoatBrown Theatre315 W. Broadway584-7777$36.75-$46.75; 7:30 p.m.<THEATER>Feb. 17-18            Get this: The set is Bloomingdale’s, the prop a black lace bra, the soundtrack re-lyricized tunes from the ’60s and ’70s and the characters four women on the brink of “The Change.” It’s a man’s worst nightmare, or possibly the funniest premise to come along in a while. We’ve all been affected by menopause, either indirectly or directly — you tiptoed over to turn the thermostat up past 50 while you were home for Christmas (as your dad gratefully peeled off his multilayered sweaters), or you found yourself sobbing violently watching the end of “When Harry Met Sally” on TBS for the hundredth time. Creator Jeanie Linders wants to alter the perception of menopause as “The Silent Passage” by encouraging healthy dialogue about issues of women’s aging. She’s also putting her money where her mouth is. As the lighthearted show travels across the country, proceeds will be donated to local Ovarian Cancer charities by the Women for Women Foundation. —<THEATER>Feb. 17-18, 24-25Drama Studio’s ‘Oscar Suite’            It’s not every day you get to see an Oscar winner up close and personal. Granted, Drama Studio isn’t going to set one into your lap or anywhere in the general vicinity, but a cast of locals fills in quite nicely. The start-up theater company gets ambitious with its second production, “Oscar Suite,” a combination of two acts from Neil Simon’s “California Suite” and an original piece by former C-J film critic Roger Fristoe, who’s also in the three-person cast. And because you never know when “Jeopardy!” will spring an Oscars category, an Academy Awards trivia quiz (with movie-related prizes) follows the show, along with anecdotes and famous acceptance speeches. —Matt MattinglyEncore Performing Arts Center128 E. Bell Ave., Clarksville(812) 284-0280$10; 8 p.m.<MUSIC>Saturday, Feb. 18Dinner and a Muddy Nasty River            The Monkey Wrench isn’t necessarily known for live music. But now that Dave Johnson (The Glasspack, Dirty Bird) is cooking there, that may change. This Saturday, his band Muddy Nasty River — a dirty blues thing, you understand — is playing two sets, one softer “dinner” set and a louder, dirtier “drinkin’” set. Along with Johnson, the band is Mark Campbell on drums and Jamie Daniels on bass. Theirs is South End blues that’s muddy, nasty and disgusting — in the most rockin’ way possible. And it also works with the chef’s culinary theme of the night: a catfish special. Seriously. —Stephen GeorgeMonkey Wrench1025 Barrett Ave. 582-2433Free; dinner 9:30 p.m., drinks 11:30 p.m.21+ (after dinner)<PHOTOGRAPHY>Sunday, Feb. 19Howard L. Bingham at Ali Center            As the cliché goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” The journalist’s response to that is, “A picture is worth a thousand words only if the writing is bad.” Luckily, world-renowned photographer Howard L. Bingham will bring both photos and words when he shares his personal stories and experiences in a presentation called “Worth a Thousand Words” at the Muhammad Ali Center downtown. Bingham, a longtime friend of Ali and honorary curator of photography at the center, will highlight his professional career and his relationship with Ali, along with some moments in history Bingham captured on film, from 1960s protests and riots to Dr. Martin Luther King’s funeral. Bingham’s award-winning work has been published by Life, Time, Look, Sports Illustrated, People, Ebony and Jet, among others, and his photography has been exhibited at the Smithsonian Institute — so there will be plenty to show and tell. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. —Kevin GibsonMuhammad Ali Center144 N. Sixth St.584-9254www.alicenter.orgFree; 3-4 p.m.<PHOTOGRAPHY>Sunday, Feb. 19            As the cliché goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” The journalist’s response to that is, “A picture is worth a thousand words only if the writing is bad.” Luckily, world-renowned photographer Howard L. Bingham will bring both photos and words when he shares his personal stories and experiences in a presentation called “Worth a Thousand Words” at the Muhammad Ali Center downtown. Bingham, a longtime friend of Ali and honorary curator of photography at the center, will highlight his professional career and his relationship with Ali, along with some moments in history Bingham captured on film, from 1960s protests and riots to Dr. Martin Luther King’s funeral. Bingham’s award-winning work has been published by Life, Time, Look, Sports Illustrated, People, Ebony and Jet, among others, and his photography has been exhibited at the Smithsonian Institute — so there will be plenty to show and tell. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. —<LECTURE>Wednesday, Feb. 22‘Colored Troops in the Civil War’            African-American history month is a celebration of collected individuals and historical prominence. However, though many of these individuals and events include Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the “Middle Passage,” Booker T. Washington, Harriett Tubman and Rosa Parks, the celebration isn’t limited to them or the situational struggle.             While these recycled biographies often cause fatigue, we can strive to bring others to light with events like the presentation by Noah Andre Trudeau, “A Chronicle of the Brave Actions of U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War,” next Wednesday at the Frazier Historical Arms Museum. Part of the Frazier’s “Living History Series,” the program highlights the 180,000 African-American soldiers who impacted the Union Army after they were allowed to enlist in 1862. —Tytianna WellsFrazier Museum829 W. Main St.753-5663$12 ($10 members/$5 students); 7:30 p.m.<LECTURE>Wednesday, Feb. 22            African-American history month is a celebration of collected individuals and historical prominence. However, though many of these individuals and events include Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the “Middle Passage,” Booker T. Washington, Harriett Tubman and Rosa Parks, the celebration isn’t limited to them or the situational struggle.             While these recycled biographies often cause fatigue, we can strive to bring others to light with events like the presentation by Noah Andre Trudeau, “A Chronicle of the Brave Actions of U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War,” next Wednesday at the Frazier Historical Arms Museum. Part of the Frazier’s “Living History Series,” the program highlights the 180,000 African-American soldiers who impacted the Union Army after they were allowed to enlist in 1862. —<ART>Through Feb. 28‘Bits and Pieces of the City Scene’            Revisit city living at the opening exhibit of Baxter Avenue’s newest gallery, Mad About Art. The show features photography by Josh McNally, Meredith Maney and Brent Michael; architectural studies by Rita Kent and Babs Turner; local cityscapes by painter David Walinski; and “Woman on the Street” sculpture by Tracy Adams. If that doesn’t draw you in, there’s plenty of jewelry to get your hands on: Ron Lehocky’s resin hearts (which benefits the CP Kids Center), Black Cat Baubles’ Swarovski crystal jewelry, Bridewell’s crystal stones and Ella’s embroidered jewelry. —Jo Anne TriplettMad About Art625 Baxter Ave.568-4916Free; Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.<ART>Through Feb. 28            Revisit city living at the opening exhibit of Baxter Avenue’s newest gallery, Mad About Art. The show features photography by Josh McNally, Meredith Maney and Brent Michael; architectural studies by Rita Kent and Babs Turner; local cityscapes by painter David Walinski; and “Woman on the Street” sculpture by Tracy Adams. If that doesn’t draw you in, there’s plenty of jewelry to get your hands on: Ron Lehocky’s resin hearts (which benefits the CP Kids Center), Black Cat Baubles’ Swarovski crystal jewelry, Bridewell’s crystal stones and Ella’s embroidered jewelry. —<ART>Through March 31‘Embodiment: Altars and Panels’            If you mix strong color with symbolism and the concept of self-discovery, you can get a sense of what the new paintings by Joseph Burks look like. The subject matter tackles universal themes such as “Contemplation,” “Sacred Fire” and “Prayer,” with the paintings displayed like altarpieces on mantles and low tables, surrounded by flicking candles, in Cheryl Chapman and Julius Friedman’s new gallery space in the Highlands (which you can view by appointment only).             The viewer doesn’t have to rely on imagination anymore to envision how a particular piece of art will look in a home setting. Chapman and Friedman’s new location gives them the chance to show the art that they display in their downtown gallery in its proper environment. —Jo Anne TriplettChapman Friedman Gallery Highlands branch584-7954Free; appointment only