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October 16, 2007

Booksmart Challenge: 'Some Poets' by Caroline Ennis

some poetsBy Caroline Ennissome poets use fabric softener to paint their walls.they eat silhouettes and digest them as sounds,building them like cells into words.some poets have pupils like bathtub drains;the world is nothing but a sudsy whirlpool gurgling downtheir optic nerves.some poets ride around in nature like it’s a vehicle.they say pine trees are like fierce arrowheadsand really mean they’re longing for the keyto secret storerooms where lost eons are ticking away,where somewhere there’s a dust-ridden file cabinet full ofstreambeds and stegosauruses.they take on adjectives like feathered headdresses.poets like to list things.they pile words atop one another like stacks of firewood.their minds are so much heat sitting cold by the back door, waiting.some poets never understand that some words are outlets, some words are plugs.some words are sex, some words are soul.some poets go on and on, comparing glass to water, teeth tofields of cotton, rain to curtains, sheets or walls.they’ll use colors like fuschia or gunmetal.they say things came apart in shardswhen what they mean to say is simply today, i hurt. i hurt.Book Smart ChallengeEntries — either flash fiction or poetry — should be no more than 300 words. The deadline is the first business day of each month (for work to be published later that month). Contestants may submit up to three entries per month. LEO reserves the right to publish any submitted work in print and online. Send entries to leo@leoweekly.com, with “Book Smart Challenge” in the subject line, or mail to LEO, Book Smart Challenge, 640 S. Fourth St., Ste. 100, Louisville, KY 40202.

some poets

By jse034

The last line is missing in this poem. ?????????!!!!!!!!

That is what we were given.

By LEO Weekly

That is what we were given.

no it wasnt

By lpville

check the originally submission. it was on there.

Fixed

By LEO Weekly

The text file submitted for web posting omitted the last line. The poem has been repaired online. It will run in its entirety in next week's print edition as well.
We are sorry for any inconvenience.